Kim Tyburski, now 40, was born with a mental disability. She’s been in a group home for five years.

“I always keep my room clean,” she says.

Sen. Portman: Not ‘appropriate’ to vote for Obamacare repeal without replacement

She lives independently, but is never alone. Mary Jones is her support staff. And while Kim is unaware of the possibility of the Affordable Care Act being repealed, Jones knows exactly who it will affect.

“You are their everything, every day, and to see that you can’t go and take care of these people — it’s not right,” Jones said.

Aimee Gonzalez, with New Avenues to Independence, said a repeal would have a ripple effect on the entire community.

“People could lose their jobs and our clients would be without a home,” she said.

The organization helped place Tyburski in her group home. The proposed healthcare overhaul of Obamacare would take away 11 percent of funding for homes like the one where Tyburski lives. Many would lose their job if a repeal were to occur, and the disabled people New Avenues to Independence helps could become homeless.

“It’s where we got the initial part of the funding, where Gov. John Kasich was able to give us a higher percentage,” said director Logan Andress.

For Tyburski, she has no understanding of what it takes to live where she lives — she just knows that she does.

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